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Radio Paddock 2023


KingOfSpa

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6 minuti fa, Mak ha scritto:

Di sicuro a livello di piloti fanno un passo avanti rispetto al 2022

Non lo metto nemmeno in dubbio guarda. 

Diciamoci la verità. La Haas sapeva di avere una macchina imbarazzante ed almeno si erano presi due piloti tanto tanto paganti. 

Mick non ha retto contro Magnussen e nemmeno lontanamente avrebbe retto nel confronto con  la nuova generazione di piloti.

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48 minuti fa, Scarlett ha scritto:

Avranno deciso di spostarlo ad altro ruolo e lui giustamente ha salutato tutti. Comunque, parere personale, penso che il problema principale della scuderia stia ancora più in alto.

Andrea Agnelli e Arrivabene hanno lasciato la Juve, vediamo cosa succederà adesso anche perchè il nome del primo si fece anche dopo la morte di Marchionne e il secondo era TP

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Sull’ultimo numero di autosport intervista a ross brown.

si parla di come sta lavorando la federazione in ottica vetture 2026

il drs viene confermato

e l’idea “geniale” pare essere l’aerodinamica attiva. Parti mobili della vettura da azionare nelle curve per avere piu’ aderenza e piu’ velocita’

……..

ancora nel 2022 non hanno capito che e’ proprio l’eccessiva aderenza e tutto cio’ che ne consegue la rovina dell’automobilismo moderno?!?

Edited by Mak
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15 ore fa, Mak ha scritto:

Sull’ultimo numero di autosport intervista a ross brown.

si parla di come sta lavorando la federazione in ottica vetture 2026

il drs viene confermato

e l’idea “geniale” pare essere l’aerodinamica attiva. Parti mobili della vettura da azionare nelle curve per avere piu’ aderenza e piu’ velocita’

……..

ancora nel 2022 non hanno capito che e’ proprio l’eccessiva aderenza e tutto cio’ che ne consegue la rovina dell’automobilismo moderno?!?

La cosa più agghiacciante è il resto che ha detto sull'aerodinamica attiva: "potremmo usarla per evitare la fuga del leader togliendogli a piacimento carico aerodinamico". 

A questo punto torniamo alle zavorre che è molto meglio.

 

 

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7 ore fa, Scarlett ha scritto:

La cosa più agghiacciante è il resto che ha detto sull'aerodinamica attiva: "potremmo usarla per evitare la fuga del leader togliendogli a piacimento carico aerodinamico". 

A questo punto torniamo alle zavorre che è molto meglio.

 

 

Spero almeno che si abbia la compiacenza di riconoscere che ormai la soglia del ridicolo è ampiamente varcata, e che trovare un solo aspetto vagamente serio in questa baracca è un'impresa, o una farsa.

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Il 1/12/2022 at 19:13 , Mak ha scritto:

Sull’ultimo numero di autosport intervista a ross brown.

si parla di come sta lavorando la federazione in ottica vetture 2026

il drs viene confermato

e l’idea “geniale” pare essere l’aerodinamica attiva. Parti mobili della vettura da azionare nelle curve per avere piu’ aderenza e piu’ velocita’

……..

ancora nel 2022 non hanno capito che e’ proprio l’eccessiva aderenza e tutto cio’ che ne consegue la rovina dell’automobilismo moderno?!?

Quindi in rettilineo uno è libero di scaricare un po' le ali per ottenere velocità ed aumentarne il carico per maggiore stabilità in curva...?

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31 minuti fa, Loris ha scritto:

Quindi in rettilineo uno è libero di scaricare un po' le ali per ottenere velocità ed aumentarne il carico per maggiore stabilità in curva...?

Praticamente sarà come avere un DRS, magari anche sull'ala anteriore, automatico come già avviene da un po' di anni sulle supercar stradali.

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Cioè passano gli anni, i lustri, i decenni e questi ancora non hanno capito che la direzione da prendere è opposta a quella che hanno preso finora: tornare alla meccanica e lasciare l'aerodinamica a quelli che costruiscono aerei e razzi spaziali. Le macchine vanno alzate da terra, non abbassate, soprattutto in curva.

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Un anno prima ...

_________

Xn2FTVO.jpg

The young man has always been neat. You know that sort of thing: well-groomed, properly after-shaved, handsome in a regolar sort of way, rugged and sensitive, physical and spiritual, the kind of boy mums want for son-in-law. With that goes a kind of innocence, and a thumbnail sketch would conclude he'd never be a world-beater. Ligier, McLaren, Theodore, Ensign: no puffs of blue smoke. Hockenheim altered much of his image.

On the edge of the pit-wall, in a blue-striped T-shirt, one of the fifty or so cogs of the Scuderia's inner family. He leans on the concrete, his eyes closed, his hands joined in silent prayer. He doesn't even dare look up as Tambay's Ferrari glides across the finish line and Patrick, in his cockpit and long before the actual finish line, raises both hands in air.

In the Ferrari pits, where the excitement is peculiarly muted, Forghieri is quickly surrounded by the avid Italian press. “No problems,” says the Ingegnere “it was a good race, it is a good result for us”. And how did he rate Patrick's performance in the car? “I don't think he made even a tenth of a mistake at any time during the race. A race of great regularity”. Then came the obvious question: considering the tragedy that had befallen Didier Pironi (and the outlook that Sunday afternoon was much darker than it is today), did the Ferrari win have a special meaning for him and for the team? Forghieri's dark eyes lowered briefly. “Of course,” he said instantly. “You will understand that”.

As Patrick was to say a half-hour later: “Sure I was nervous before the race. Everyone was nervous. More nervous than usual. I did the first twenty-five laps thinking about my two chums, about Gilles and Didier. I mean, I was thinking about them non stop”. How not? One might ask. If life can be called nasty, brutal and short, so can the description of Tambay's recent career: in, when his friend of four-wheeling up mountain-slopes, Gilles Villeneuve, is killed at Zolder; he wins his first ever race, after fifty-three attempts, when his team-mate Didier Pironi is undergoing a critical operation in a Heidelberg hospital.

The last two months must have looked to Patrick as though a bolt from the blue had been indefinitely extended; lightning hadn't just struck, it was continuing to run through his life, as though liquid. After all, in a way, this is Tambay's third career. One, with McLaren, ended with unsuccess, with hard words, hard times. The man doesn't like enclosed spaces, human chessgames. He gave up tennis, which he played obligingly and cavalierly, with much style and little result, in favour of golf, sailing, climbing, the wide open spaces: “I don't like to feel confined by the court,” he once explained. So it was with the McLaren-Marlboro motor home, with Edward Everett Mayer on his back.

Which is why the move up to Ferrari was so pleasurable for him. The night of his satisfying third behind Lauda and Pironi at Brands, he gave yet another version of why the old man's magic still works at Maranello. The Commendatore's talents, said Patrick, might be sheer common sense; it had also to be admitted that he was shrewd in business and politics; it was undeniable that he was consumed by a passion for racing which rubbed off on everyone around him (or as his team-mate Pironi put it to me a fortnight ago, “Ferrari taught me that a single-minded passion is not just selfish, but can also be noble”); but above all, Tambay said “It is sheer humanity, it is the personal nature of one's relations with the man, it is the way he looks at you and talks to you”.

The move to Ferrari had come after Patrick called a halt to his Formula One racing a second time, when it had barely re-started: at Kyalami, when I can remember him well sitting on the dingy steps of the control tower while we worked out how he would announce that his disgust with the politics of the sport were driving him definitely out of the sport. Disgust with what? “ With the fact that drivers aren't taken as people and their needs are not understood”, he had said. Well, up on the podium, he looked strangely ill-at-ease. It either wasn't his bag or he just didn't have enough practice; or it didn't mean that much to him or his mind was elsewhere. But, of course, the man had been altered by his first victory: “After four races, I think I'm much more highly motivated. I have a lot more determination, and I've applied myself carefully. After all, success comes from confidence”. Quite true. And what is the sweet smell of success? “You ask me if I feel good about winning the race? I can tell you it is a very visceral feeling, success.”

Was it really a piece of cake? Patrick was calm and logical. First, he indulged in the usual driver tribute to the team effort which makes a win possible. “It's not an individual who wins,” he said “it's a team. It's what you can do for them and what they can do for you”. It all sounded a bit as though a down-hill skier were saying that the man who made his skis was the real winner of the race; or Miss America saying it was the plastic surgeon who gave her her beauty. Then he went on to explain: “I think today is a reward for my friends, as much as for me. Don't ask me why. I just felt it that way. I don't think of it as, hey, I won a grand prix. I think of it in terms of the people who are close to me: my father, my wife, my friends. I've waited fifty-two races to get here. But in the past, I think I was without technological and psychological backup. Maybe because of pressures inside me, I didn't get the results I thought I deserved: as at Monza or at the British GP last year (he wound up the season with a single point). I made mistakes while I was leading Lafitte: I say, because I wasn't backed up psychologically.”

And the race itself? “I had no problems, technically. We picked the right compound (it was a B) and the car was beautifully balanced. It was very good under braking and the engine was faithful. At the beginning, I tried not to do too much and save my tyres, but I soon discovered that I was much better under braking than Arnoux; I also had better pickup coming out of the corners. I passed both Renaults and I knew there was no way I was going to catch Piquet. So I just waited. Hoping something would go wrong or they'd cock up the pit-stop. So I just set a pace. Then, Piquet had his trouble with whoever-it-was (Salazar) and I thought to myself, Patrick be super-careful with the back-markers. I had plenty of time to think, and at the end, I could run down my revs from 11,5 to 10,5 or less.”

Any problems? “Yes, they kept putting up this pit-board that said 'okay, okay'. And I thought, I know I'm okay, okay. But knowing you're okay okay ... well, it's not the usual thing. But still, I had a feeling it was my day. All the little things meshed together. The driver is just the man who puts it together ...”

His intention? “To keep Didier's capital, his points, intact to the end of the season. At this moment, next year is no worry.” And small wonder, since he has already signed. A comeback from a young man who seems all surface but who stands on his own deeper ground. His world may have been changed, but Patrick has not. The alterations are within.

Keith Bostford, “Tambay, De Angelis: two insiders make it inside", «Grand Prix International», Vol. IV, n.54, 1982, pp. 12-17.

Il riferimento a de Angelis, nel titolo dell'articolo, si giustifica in base alla considerazione che nello stesso numero della rivista venne data trattazione anche del gran premio austriaco: con un altro approfondimento, il medesimo autore, ragionò circa gli episodi relativi alla Stiria.

 

Edited by Elio11
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