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Radio Paddock Maggio 2015


Andrea Gardenal
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April 3 - Australia (Albert Park)

April 10 - China (Shanghai)

April 24 - Bahrain (Sakhir)

May 1 - Russia (Sochi)

May 15 - Spain (Barcelona)

May 29 - Monaco (Monte Carlo)

June 12 - Canada (Montreal)

June 26 - Britain (Silverstone)

July 3 - Austria (Red Bull Ring)

July 17 - Europe (Baku)

July 31 - Germany (Hockenheim)

August 7 - Hungary (Hungaroring)

August 28 - Belgium (Spa)

September 4 - Italy (Monza)

September 18 - Singapore (Marina Bay)

September 25 - Malaysia (Sepang)

October 9 - Japan (Suzuka)

October 23 - USA (Austin)

October 30 - Mexico (Mexico City)

November 13 - Brazil (Interlagos)

November 27 - Abu Dhabi (Yas Marina)

Contrordine: questa è la vera bozza di calendario proposta dalla FOM, che però dovrà  venire approvata nelle prossime settimane dallo strategy group

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Geniali davvero allora :asd:

 

Mi auguro davvero che per la GP2 facciano anche la pausa Monza-Abu Dhabi, due mesi di distanza tra le ultime due gare devono essere da orgasmo :sbav:

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àˆ un pò il mio pensiero, ma potrebbe anche essere una mossa mediatica: così facendo la Haas si assicurerebbe un campione del mondo, il che potrebbe aiutare a trovare altri sponsor.

E comunque il fatto che un team nascar diventi la squadra satellite Ferrari mi fa imbestialire

 

Ho visto quanti sponsor tirano i due campioni del mondo in McLaren  :ninja:

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Un grande. Non lo avevo mai incontrato di persona (l'ho visto comunque correre dal vivo, a Imola) ma penso che bastasse guardare anche solo una gara di turismo italiano negli ultimi anni per trovarlo, ha gareggiato un po' ovunque. A 70 e passa anni e una grande passione immutata, mancherà  un personaggio così.

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Un grande. Non lo avevo mai incontrato di persona (l'ho visto comunque correre dal vivo, a Imola) ma penso che bastasse guardare anche solo una gara di turismo italiano negli ultimi anni per trovarlo, ha gareggiato un po' ovunque. A 70 e passa anni e una grande passione immutata, mancherà  un personaggio così.

Era una persona molto cordiale, un vero gentleman driver pane e salame.

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Michelin has made it clear it is ready to make a return to Formula 1 when the championship's existing tyre contract comes to an end.

The French tyre manufacturer was last involved in 2006, opting to depart at the end of that year after a five-season spell as it was unhappy about a move to a single supplier from 2008.

Bridgestone initially took up the reins prior to a switch to current supplier Pirelli from 2011, with its current contract running to the end of 2016.

With a tender to be put out early next year, Michelin Motorsport director Pascal Couasnon told Italian publication Autosprint: "Why not? We are fully open to a return, but on some precise conditions - Formula 1 must change its technical regulations.

"Tyres must become a technical object again, not just a tool to do a more-or-less spectacular show.

"Michelin has put forward some precise conditions in order to return to F1.

"We want 18-inch tyres, which we already use in Formula E, and soon in another series.

 

"If F1 wants to consider our proposals we are here, fully open, with a strong will to return.

"If, instead, the prospects are to keep things as they are now, then thanks but we aren't interested.

"At the next tender for F1 tyre supply we will make our proposals, why not?

"Then it will be a problem for [bernie] Ecclestone or the FIA whether to accept them or not."

Couasnon states Michelin is now "open to supply tyres in a monopoly regime with a sole supplier", as it is about to do in MotoGP when it takes over from Bridgestone.

Pirelli's brief upon entering the sport was to make a high-degradation tyre that would lead to multiple pit stops after Bridgestone's highly-durable rubber made for boring races.

Although Pirelli fulfilled the brief, the downside has resulted in drivers being unable to push to the limit, instead being forced to preserve their tyres.

When asked as to what he dislikes about the current F1 tyres, Couasnon said: "Tyres should offer stable performance and grip levels.

"It's not normal that after a few laps a driver says 'I need to slow down otherwise the tyres won't last'.

"That shouldn't happen. These days F1 drivers can't show their talent because the tyres don't allow them to.

"At the Spa 24 Hours GT race, too, some tyres can't even last for two consecutive stints.

"This happens when you are in a sole-supplier regime and you have no motivation to improve. That's called mediocrity, not technology.

"If instead you have a technologically interesting rule book, even if you are sole supplier, you are forced to offer a product at its best level."

 

http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/118945

Edited by Kraven VanHelsing
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Non credo che a Pirelli abbiano puntato la pistola alla testa nel momento di firmare il contratto nel quale, suppongo, sia scritto esplicitamente che il gommista deve sottostare alle richieste della Federazione. Se avessero voluto avrebbero potuto rinunciare a scendere a compromessi di questo tipo e non tornare in F1.

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Michelin fece un gran lavoro.....entrò e ridicolizzò Bridgestone....mi è dispiaciuto il loro abbandono ma hanno i loro validi motivi.

Indiananapolis 2005 fu un epic fail clamoroso
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